Meteor shower will pass over Australia after midnight

The Leonid meteor shower will shoot fireballs across the sky this week

People across the country will be able to witness the celestial wonders of Leonid Meteor Shower between midnight and the break of dawn on November 17 and November 18.

Fireballs and "earthgrazer" meteors are also a hallmark of the Leonid shower. Most are so small they are vapourised in the atmosphere.

NASA says the best way to view the shower is to find an area well away from street lights, dress up warm and lie flat with your feet towards the east.

Bright meteors can also be colorful, and they are fast, moving at speeds of up to 44 miles per second - in fast meteors.

The Leonid meteor shower overlaps with the Northern Taurid meteor shower, so some meteors from that shower may be visible as well. But you do not need to look in the direction of the galaxy because the meteor will appear across the sky. The later you can stay up, the more rewards you should see, as Leo rises higher in the sky.

According to the UK Met Office most of the UK is expected to be covered in clouds in the next 24 hours so clear skies can be difficult to find
According to the UK Met Office most of the UK is expected to be covered in clouds in the next 24 hours so clear skies can be difficult to find

This specific shower is linked to the Leo constellation. And cloudless and moonless lights also enable better viewing.

November skies will carry a brilliant spot to 2020 - really, we could see around 10 to 15 splendid spots an hour short-term Monday into Tuesday as the yearly Leonid meteor shower tops over the United States. The Geminids will peak on December 13 and 14, also with little moonlight in the sky, and the Ursids will peak on December 21 through 22, though there will be a half-moon in the sky at that point.

Leonids comes from leftover particles from comet 55P / Temple-Tuttle.

Meteors can be harder to see when there is a bright moon, but fortunately the moon will only be 5 percent visible, according to the American Meteor Society.

In Australia, the shower will be most visible after midnight, but the Bureau of Meteorology has predicted there will be no "meteor storm" - which occurs when 1000 meteors per hour are seen. "But scientists know that meteors are not stars at all - they are just bits of rock!" Although such an event has been associated with the Leonid meteor shower before, the last storm happened in 2001. Back in 1966, one Leonid storm saw thousands of meteors per minute drop consistently for 15 minutes, nearly like a rain storm.

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