Congenital heart defects not linked to severe COVID-19 symptoms

Michigan woman goes home after 196 days in hospital with COVID

The two studies together show that blood groups A and AB are particularly at risk of organ failure due to COVID-19 as compared to blood types O and B.

The authors hypothesize that the presence of virus-neutralizing anti-A and anti-B antibodies on mucosal surfaces of some type O individuals may explain the relative protection for this blood type. The study suggests that people with blood types A, B, or AB may be more likely to be infected with Covid-19 than people with type O.

Researchers of this study found that Covid-19 patients with blood groups A and AB had an increased risk of severe clinical outcomes, compared to patients with blood groups O or B.

Researchers from Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons in NY say that at the beginning of the pandemic, many feared that congenital heart disease would be as big a risk factor for severe COVID-19 as adult-onset cardiovascular disease. While those answers seem to vary month to month, a pair of studies find your blood type may play a key role in how badly COVID-19 affects you.

While people with blood types A and AB did not have longer overall hospital stays than those with types O or B, they did remain in the intensive care unit (ICU) for a longer average time, which may also signal a greater COVID-19 severity level, the researchers said.

Lead author Dr Mypinder Sekhon, of the University of British Columbia, said: "Of particular importance as we continue to traverse the pandemic, we now have a wide range of survivors who are exiting the acute part of Covid-19, but we need to explore mechanisms by which to risk stratify those with longer-term effects".

"We have the advantage of a strong control group - Denmark is a small, ethnically homogenous country with a public health system and a central registry for lab data - so our control is population-based, giving our findings a strong foundation", Torben added. Earlier in March, a study of over 2,100 coronavirus patients in Wuhan and Shenzhen (also not peer-reviewed) found that people with Type O blood had a lower risk of infection. They can only receive transfusions from O positive or O negative blood types.

As COVID-19 cases continue to rise in the United Kingdom, more people will suffer "debilitating" long-term after-effects of a related infection, academics have warned.

In July, a study looking at 1,600 patients in Spain and Italy showed slightly higher rates of severe respiratory failure in patients with blood type A compared to those with blood type O.

In a second study also published on Wednesday, Canadian scientists examined 95 COVID-19 patients in Vancouver between February and April.

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