Northern Irish court dismisses no-deal Brexit challenge

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson reacts during the Convention of the North at the Magna Centre in Rotherham Britain

The trio of challenges, which were heard together, focused on various aspects of a no-deal Brexit on October 31.

"Within the world of politics the well-recognised phenomena of claim and counterclaim, assertion and counter-assertion, allegation and denial, blow and counter-blow, adjustment and modification of government policy, public statements, unpublished deliberations, posturing, strategy and tactics are the very essence of what is both countenanced and permitted in a democratic society", he added. He said the cases involved political matters that the courts should not intervene on.

Lawyers for the applicants in Belfast argued by creating a hard border on the island of Ireland, a no-deal Brexit on 31 Octoberwould undermine the Good Friday agreement and other agreements which underpin cross-border co-operation between the United Kingdom and Ireland.

"Within the world of politics, the well-recognised phenomena of claim and counter-claim, assertion and counter-assertion, allegation and denial, blow and counter-blow, adjustment and modification of government policy, public statements, unpublished deliberations, posturing, strategy and tactics are the very essence of what is both countenanced and permitted in a democratic society".

McCord, one of three people backing the case, said he would fight the decision in an appeal that could be heard in Belfast as early as Friday and hoped to join the other challenges in the U.K.'s highest court next week.

The government rejected that argument during two days of legal proceedings in Belfast High Court, PA reported.

"The reliance of medicines and medical products' supply chains on the shore straits crossing make them particularly vulnerable to severe extended delays; three-quarters of medicines come via the short straits", the report says.

The Appeal Court judges will sit again at 1pm on Thursday to consider the matter.

"The Northern Irish court has followed the English High Court's approach on this, rather than the Scottish Court of Session", tweeted constitutional law expert David Allen Green.

Rights campaigner Raymond McCord outside Belfast High Court. He now intends to push forward with the issue at the Belfast Appeal Court, which means it could be heard at the Supreme Court next week.

"These are groundbreaking legal cases and the plan is for all of these cases to meet in the Supreme Court", O'Hare added.

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