British PM May to Launch New Push for Brexit Deal Next Month

Prime minister Theresa May's Conservative Party is in a slump among voters a poll says

A government spokesperson said May will put forward a Withdrawal Agreement Bill, making Brexit law in the United Kingdom, in the week of June 3, before the summer parliamentary recess in July.

Brexit had been due to take place on March 29, but May was unable to get her divorce deal ratified by parliament, which rejected the so-called Withdrawal Agreement three times, and now the date is set for October 31.

It said: "No leader can bound his or her successor, so the deal would likely be at best temporary, at worst illusory".

Talks on Tuesday evening between May and leader of the opposition Jeremy Corbyn "were both useful and constructive", he added.

"However, it was agreed that it is imperative to bring forward the Withdrawal Agreement Bill in time for it to receive royal assent by the summer parliamentary recess".

Brexit had been due to take place on March 29, but the deadline has since been extended to October 31 to buy the government more time to come up with a plan almost three years after British voters opted to leave the EU.

Mrs May and her effective deputy David Lidington - who has been leading the negotiations with Labour - led the Cabinet discussions, but other ministers involved in the talks contributed.

Parliament usually breaks for the summer in the second half of July although the exact date has not yet been set.

It is understood that, in the meeting with May tonight, Corbyn rejected any suggestion that Labour would support the withdrawal agreement bill without prior agreement.

It read: "We believe that a customs union-based deal with Labour will very likely lose the support of Conservative MPs, like us, who backed the Withdrawal Agreement in March (in many cases very reluctantly), and you would be unlikely to gain as many Labour MPs to compensate".

Theresa May has set out the Brexit compromises she will make to Labour amid a warning that signing up to customs union with the EU will split her party.

Dominic Raab, the UK's Brexit secretary, who was nominally the chief British negotiator for the deal now on the table said on Thursday: " I can not in good conscience support the terms proposed for our deal with the European Union".

The Prime Minister was warned by senior Conservatives that she risks losing the "loyal middle" of the Tory party if she gives ground on the issue.

"We don't think there is a deal there yet", Labour economy spokesperson John McDonnell said.

The Prime Minister is understood to have requested the meeting, and also dispatched her chief Brexit negotiator Olly Robbins to Brussels for two days of talks about the possibility of making changes to the Political Declaration to strengthen protections for workers rights and request a say in future European Union trade deals for the UK.

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