Saudi kingdom pursuing justice in Khashoggi murder, says official

Saudi kingdom pursuing justice in Khashoggi murder, says official

Amid calls for Saudi Arabia to cooperate with a United Nations -led investigation into the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the head of the kingdom's Human Rights Commission said on Thursday the accused killers were being brought to justice and reiterated the government's opposition to suggestions for an worldwide probe into the case.

Turkey requested a red notice for 18 suspects November 15 and another two December 21, the ministry said on Twitter.

Turkey urged Saudi Arabia to extradite the perpetrators of the crime, as well as to provide information on the location of Khashoggi's body. It said earlier on Thursday that Saudi authorities should disclose the names of defendants and the charges they face if it wanted to avoid questions over the "sincerity of judicial proceedings in the kingdom". He gave no names or other details, however, as the suspects' identities have not yet been made public. "We find it hard to understand why an official working in the area of human rights would possibly be unsettled by efforts to shed light on all aspects of the Khashoggi murder", the Turkish presidency said.

"Justice in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia operates pursuant to worldwide law and it does so in all transparency", Al-Aiban told the Geneva forum.

The Saudi public prosecutor's spokesman said late previous year that 11 Saudis had been indicted and referred for trial over the case, with authorities seeking the death penalty for five.

Eleven men are on trial in Saudi Arabia, accused of involvement in the killing.

Although a country rich with exceptional natural, cultural, and heritage sites, Saudi Arabia is only now developing its tourism sector beyond its current structure, which has been created to cater all-year-round to religious pilgrims.

After countries around the world, including every European Union member nation, encouraged Saudi Arabia to cooperate with an global investigation into the Washington Post journalist's death, Bandar bin Mohammed al-Aiban responded Thursday, saying his country already took care of everything.

Agnes Callamard, the UN's special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, was in Turkey in late January to probe what happened to the journalist.

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