Jury awards $29M in J&J baby powder cancer case

California jury orders J&J to pay US$29 million in latest talc cancer trial

The verdict Wednesday in favor of Teresa Leavitt and her spouse, Dean McElroy, came after a trial that started in January, CNN reported.

The jury found Johnson & Johnson had failed to warn consumers of the health risks of its defective products and awarded $29.4 million in damages to Terry Leavitt and her husband.

"We will pursue an appeal because Johnson's Baby Powder does not contain asbestos or cause cancer".

Just past year, a jury decided that Johnson & Johnson had to pay more than $4 billion in damages to a group of women who claimed that asbestos in its products caused their ovarian cancers.

The New Jersey-based company is likely to appeal the verdict, which was made in California Superior Court in Oakland.

Most health-care companies performed well, but Johnson & Johnson struggled with claims that its talc baby powder contained the carcinogen asbestos.

Leavitt's doctors say her mesothelioma is advanced and she's not expected to live beyond 2020, according to testimony in the case.

The woman had alleged that traces of asbestos in J&J's products such as Johnson's baby powder led to her contracting mesothelioma, a form of cancer that affects the lungs and heart.

"We respect the legal process and reiterate that jury verdicts are not medical, scientific or regulatory conclusions about a product", Johnson & Johnson said in a statement. It was the first of more than a dozen talc cases against the company scheduled for trial in 2019.

"Hundreds of internal J&J documents showed the truth that it has been hiding for years".

Talc and asbestos are often mined together from metamorphic rocks, particularly in North Carolina, Alabama, Vermont and northern Italy.

Fox News senior judicial analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano on the fallout from a report that Johnson & Johnson's Baby Powder contained asbestos and the company was aware of it for decades.

Leavitt's trial originally included J&J's talc supplier, Imerys Talc America, a unit of Imerys SE, as a co-defendant. Johnson & Johnson has repeatedly pointed to studies that have not shown such a link. Before that, in 2016, the company was ordered to pay $55 million to a woman who claimed she got cancer from its talcum powder. They said their baby powder "is safe and asbestos-free".

A Mount Sinai researcher wrote in a company letter in 1971 that he had detected a "relatively small" amount of asbestos in the baby powder.

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