Finnish government resigns after healthcare reform fails

Finland's prime minister Juha Sipila offers government's resignation over failed healthcare reforms

The social and healthcare reform, which several governments have tried to implement, will collapse today, and will be moved to the next government.

"Prime Minister Sipila will request his resignation because the health care reform can not be accomplished during this government term", Antti Kaikkonen wrote on Twitter.

The government of Finland through Prime Minister Juha Sipila has tendered its resignation request following its failure to oversee a health care reform.

The government's collapse came after Sipila failed to push through reforms that had been considered a crucial part of the country's three-party governing coalition plan to balance public finances, Efe news reported.

Sipila has since 2015 headed a coalition made up of his Centre Party, the conservative National Coalition, and Blue Reform, a moderate faction spun off from the far-right.

Claims that the reforms would bring three billion euros ($3.3 billion) of savings to the country's welfare bill have also been repeatedly called into question.

Finland's entire government resigned Friday after the governing coalition failed to agree on the welfare state reform, just one month before elections were due to be held.

"Our government operates on a "do or die" principle".

He said there was no other way out of the situation hence chose to take responsibility.

Finland's President Sauli Niinisto accepted Sipila's resignation.

The current cabinet will retain their jobs until a new government is formed after the election, but will only work to finish off business that is already in progress.

"Since elections were already set for 14 April, the resignation of the government is not a big deal at all at this point".

"You could call this a failure for the government", Jokinen said.

Sipila's decision is also an admission that the government was unable to rally enough support to push its pro-market reforms through parliament.

Related:

Comments


Other news