Apple infringed three Qualcomm patents, jury finds

Apple infringed three Qualcomm patents, jury finds

This, however, doesn't necessarily mean that Qualcomm will have to pay Apple this amount.

But anorther legal decision involving Qualcomm and Apple was announced today.

In a lawsuit filed two years ago, Apple sued Qualcomm, alleging that the chip supplier had broken the cooperation agreement by not paying almost $1 billion in patent royalty rebates.

On another front in the complex legal battle between two United States companies a federal judge in Southern California on Thursday issued a preliminary ruling that Qualcomm owes Apple almost a billion dollars in patent royalty rebate payments the chip maker is withholding, according to USA media reports. Apple has sought to dismantle what it calls Qualcomm's illegal business model of both licensing patents and selling chips to phone makers. Don Rosenberg, executive vice president and general counsel of Qualcomm said that "Apple has already offset the payment at issue under the agreement against royalties that were owed to Qualcomm".

Judge Gonzalo Curiel of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California on Thursday ruled that Qualcomm, the world's biggest supplier of mobile phone chips, was obligated to pay almost $1 billion in rebate payments to Apple, which for years used Qualcomm's modem chips to connect iPhones to wireless data networks.

5G at the Qualcomm booth at CES International in Las Vegas. A jury announced the verdict Friday March 15 that Apple should pay $31 million in damages for infringing on patents for technology owned

It seems as though Apple and Qualcomm never stop sparring, with the latest development in years-long disputes between the companies being a preliminary victory for Apple. It declined to comment on whether it would appeal. That trial is scheduled to start April 15.

In other cases against Apple, Qualcomm has won sales bans on iPhones in Germany and China, though the Chinese ban has not been enforced and Apple has taken moves it believes allow it to resume sales in Germany.

The dispute between Apple and Qualcomm is also part of an antitrust lawsuit that the U.S. Federal Trade Commission filed in 2017.

The jury agreed with Qualcomm's contention that it should be paid $1.41 per iPhone relying on three of its patents. "The three patents found to be infringed in this case represent just a small fraction of Qualcomm's valuable portfolio of tens of thousands of patents".

Gaston Kroub, a patent lawyer in NY not involved in the case, said the verdict was clearly a win for Qualcomm. "This isn't something that will bring Apple to the table with any sense of urgency", Kroub said.

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