Insects Are Dying in an Aggressive Rate

Broadacre cropland has removed crucial habitat for insects and other animals

Insects are also the world's top pollinators - 75 per cent of 115 top global food crops depend on animal pollination, including cocoa, coffee, almonds and cherries.

The projections are based on the downward trajectory of the world's insect mass, which is thought to be falling by 2.5% per year.

MORE: Pesticide ban could threaten viability of East Anglia's sugar beet industry, farmers told The review, published in the journal Biological Conservation, looked at 73 historical reports on insects from around the world, including studies in the United Kingdom, and found insects ranging from butterflies and bees to dung beetles were among the most affected.

The scientists suggest that liberal use of pesticides as well as rising global temperatures and extreme weather events due to climate change are the likely culprits.

More than 40% of insect species could become extinct in the next few decades, according to the newly published study titled, "Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers", CNN reported. He said: 'It is very rapid.

We learned that more than 40% of the species of insects are declining and a third is already endangered.

Many other studies in recent years have shown that individual species of insects, such as bees, have suffered huge declines, particularly in developed economies.

"We estimate the current proportion of insect species in decline.to be twice as high as that of vertebrates, and the pace of local species extinction. eight times higher", the review states.

The researchers found that declines in nearly all regions may lead to the extinction of 40% of insects over the next few decades.

Speaking with The Guardian, report co-author Francisco Sánchez-Bayo of the University of Sydney said: "If insect species losses can not be halted, this will have catastrophic consequences for both the planet's ecosystems and for the survival of mankind".

Various insects are also a common food source for larger animals.

Previous studies have looked at smaller areas, with a 2017 study showing 76 percent of flying insects had disappeared from German nature preserves and a study last fall that showed insect populations in pristine rainforest in Puerto Rico have also seen precipitous declines, dropping a factor of 60.

"There is not a single cause, but the evidence is clear, to halt this crisis we must urgently reverse habitat fragmentation, prevent and mitigate climate change, clean up polluted waters and replace pesticide dependency with more sustainable, ecologically-sensitive farming".

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