Hyundai Elevate Concept Will Drive And Walk Anywhere To Save Lives

The idea is that the Elevate could help first responders get directly to victims

What's more, the concept, which was developed in conjunction with Sundberg-Ferar, is based around a modular EV platform that allows different bodies to be switched and swopped when needed. Reaching the disaster struck faster means saving a lot of lives.

Its body can be changed and entered from all four sides, its robotic legs have five degrees of freedom and wheel hub propulsion motors.

Legs can also be folded away, allowing the vehicle to drive like any other auto on the road.

South Korean automaker Hyundai took a stroll into the future on Monday (January 7) with a auto that can walk and climb on wheeled legs.

Hyundai sees this capability as useful in multiple situations, but perhaps most importantly as a first responder vehicle in situations such as forest fires, earthquakes, hurricanes or floods.

In a statement, Hyundai added: "At CES 2019, Hyundai Cradle is presenting a totally new vehicle concept that combines the power of robotics and EV technology to take people where no vehicle has been before". In fact, says Hyundai, the disposition of its limbs make it capable of "both mammalian and reptilian walking gaits".

"Imagine a vehicle stranded in a snow ditch just 10 feet off the highway being able to walk or climb over the treacherous terrain, back to the road potentially saving its injured passengers - this is the future of vehicular mobility", said David Byron, design manager at Sundberg-Ferar, which collaborated with Hyundai on the Elevate concept. This allows the Elevate to drive at highway speeds just like any other vehicle.

The manufacturer claims the model can climb a five-foot wall and step over a gap of the same distance - all while keeping the passengers level. "Elevate can drive to the scene and climb right over flood debris or crumbled concrete", explains John Suh, Hyundai vice president and head of Hyundai Cradle.

And the technology goes beyond emergency situations.

"Imagine a vehicle stranded in a snow ditch just 10 feet off the highway being able to walk or climb over the treacherous terrain, back to the road potentially saving its injured passengers", said said David Byron, design manager at Sundberg-Ferar.

It could also be used in more conventional, urban situations, designer David Byron of Sundberg-Ferar consultancy told Reuters at a presentation unveiling the concept.

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