Healthy Baby Born To Woman Who Received World’s First Deceased Womb Transplant

Baby born after womb transplant from dead donor

Baylor has had two successful births from live donations; Cleveland Clinic is working toward deceased donations; and her own program will be performing both living and deceased donor transplants over the next year. Uterus transplantation, even from living donors, is still a very new procedure.

Since then there have been 39 such procedures, resulting in 11 live births.

It was then transplanted to the woman who was given medication to weaken her immune system so her body would not reject the uterus.

A team in Brazil transplanted the womb from a dead 45-year-old woman into an infertile 32-year-old recipient, who went on to have a healthy baby girl.

The surgical team had to connect the donor's uterus with the veins, arteries, ligaments, and vaginal canal of the recipient.

She doesn't know it yet, but her birth set a milestone in medical history, providing new opportunities for women who otherwise couldn't carry and deliver a child.

"Our results provide a proof-of-concept for a new option for women with uterine infertility", said Dani Ejzenberg, a doctor at the teaching hospital of the University of Sao Paulo.

After surgery, the anonymous recipient remained in intensive care for two days before spending another six days on a specialised transplant ward.

Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society president Clifford Librach said the challenges of transplant surgery, the need for immunosuppressing drugs to stop organ rejection that could affect the fetus, and other potential risks are big factors that will likely keep this surgery from becoming commonplace.

It detailed how five months after the transplant, the uterus showed no signs of rejection, ultrasound scans were normal, and the recipient was having regular menstruation.

Fifteen were fertilised, with 8 resulting in embryos that were subsequently preserved for later implantation.

Before the transplant, the woman underwent in vitro fertilization, resulting in eight fertilized eggs that were frozen.

The woman's pregnancy was normal, and doctors performed a Caesarean section on December 15, 2017, after about 36 weeks (a full term is about 40 weeks).

Four years ago, a 36-year-old Swedish woman also successfully delivered a healthy child using IVF via a womb provided by an unrelated benefactor. In this case, a cesarean section was performed for birth at 35 weeks gestation, and along with the delivery of an nearly 6 pound healthy baby girl, the uterus was also removed.

Doctors say the unidentified woman gave birth via a cesarean section.

At the age of seven months, the baby continued to breastfeed and weighed 15lbs and 14oz (7.2 kilos).

The downside of this surgery was high doses of immunosuppression drugs and moderate, although manageable, levels of blood loss. Of the 10-15 per cent of couples with infertility problems, one in 500 women have uterine abnormalities. Before uterine transplants, these women could only adopt children, or use a surrogate. The demonstrated success of a procedure involving a deceased donor, he says, may spare live donors from undergoing risky procedures, and make transplants possible for far more women.

"This opens the possibility of women donating their womb following death, as with many other organs".

He said any doubts he had about the potential importance of uterus transplants were erased after meeting the mother of the first baby born after a live donor uterus transplant.

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