Christmas Dinner Rocketed To International Space Station

Dragon Falcon 9 launch CRS-14

SpaceX CEO and lead designer Elon Musk tweeted that the reusable booster was undamaged and appeared to be transmitting data.

It was the first missed landing at Cape Canaveral. NASA was working Tuesday to replace the rotten food in time for 1:16 p.m. launch time Wednesday. SpaceX engineers were less happy with the first-stage booster which dropped into the Atlantic Ocean off the Florida coast, missing its designated landing zone on ground. Moreover, when the rocket successfully landed on the court - delivering the ongoing mission of the SSO-A SmallSat Express more than 60 satellites from 35 partners to orbit - SpaceX experts also noted that the missile does not require any lengthy and complicated fix work, thereby indicating that subsequent start will be made, apparently, without any visible technical changes.

The SpaceX Dragon capsule will be launched aboard a Falcon 9 rocket, with liftoff scheduled for 10:16 a.m. California time.

Today's launch was delayed by a day on short notice thanks to some moldy mouse chow.

Other experiments included in the mission include an effort to measure and perform 3D mapping of Earth's tropical and temperate forests; a test of a robotic technology to refuel spacecraft in space; and two student experiments inspired by the "Guardians of the Galaxy" films. Over 5,600 pounds of supplies, experiments, and equipment will arrive in a few days.

And the Dragon brings a special treat for one class of spacecraft: It's carrying a satellite deployment system called SlingShot that can fit inside the Cygnus spacecraft's berth to deploy up to 18 cubesats.

The Dragon space capsule that flew on Wednesday was used once before, on a supply mission in February 2017.

The timing of the holiday doesn't work out well for three of the crew members now aboard the space station. The company expects to start launching station crews next year. The others return home on December 20, leaving only three for Christmas dinner, not counting the mice and worms.

The Dragon spacecraft itself should leave the station and head back to Earth in January, according to Kirt Costello, ISS program chief scientist at Johnson Space Center.

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