Boeing warns pilots about 'angle of attack' sensors after 737 MAX crash

Boeing’s first 737 MAX 8 rolls out of the final assembly building in Renton in December 2015. More than 200 MAXs are in service around the world

The FAA said erroneous data from the "angle of attack" sensor, which helps prevent the plane from stalling and diving, could cause flight crew to have difficulty controlling the airplane and lead to "excessive nose-down attitude, significant altitude loss, and possible impact with the terrain".

"The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee has indicated that Lion Air flight 610 experienced erroneous input from one of its AOA (Angle of Attack) sensors", Boeing said in a statement.

Bloomberg News reported the planned bulletin from Boeing earlier on Tuesday and said the manufacturer would alert pilots to follow existing procedures to address the issue.

(BA.N) on how pilots should handle false readings from a plane sensor that authorities say occurred on a 737 Max jet that crashed off the Indonesian coast last week. One of the critical ways a plane determines if a stall is imminent is the angle of attack measurement.

But the preliminary result of the investigation will only be known at the end of November.

The agency said it would probe what caused the indicator problem and whether proper repairs were done - including replacing the faulty component, he added. Pilots flying with an AOA sensor generating erroneous inputs to the system can experience the inability to engage the aircraft's autopilot system, among other problems.

The Angle of Attack sensor, shown to reporters at a press conference in Jakarta on Wednesday, was manufactured by Minnesota-based Rosemount Aerospace Inc.

On the fatal flight, the plane hit the water at very high speed after the flight crew had been cleared to return to the airport several minutes after takeoff.

Lion Air's first two attempts at fixing the sensor were unsuccessful before it was replaced on October 28 - a day before the plane plunged into the ocean, the ABC reported.

Officials have now said that the incident will be thoroughly investigated.

"If the nose is trimmed down on an aircraft, it becomes hard for the crew to hold it", said a person briefed on Boeing's bulletin, SeattleTimes reported.

This affects almost 250 aircraft flown by USA airlines like Southwest, American and United, the FAA said.

While modern jetliners primarily operate on autopilot, the computerized system can disengage when airspeed indicators malfunction, forcing pilots to manually fly the aircraft.

A Boeing 737-900ER operated by PT Lion Mentari Airlines clipped a pole late Wednesday while taxiing at Bengkulu airport in southern Sumatra, shearing the tip of its left wing, the carrier said in a statement.

A winglet on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant in Renton, Washington, on December 8, 2015. Once that happens, it may try to right itself by pushing the nose down, reports the Straight Times. There were more than 180 people on board.

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