Ninth Child Dies in Virus Outbreak at NJ Center

9th child dies in adenovirus outbreak at NJ health facility, Health Department confirms

The patient was one of 25 sickened by an outbreak of a respiratory virus called adenovirus, which swept through Wanaque between September 26 and October 22, mainly affecting patients in the pediatric ventilator unit. Adenovirus hasn't been confirmed in another person who died Friday afternoon. A staff member at the facility also became ill as part of the outbreak but has since recovered.

Another child is dead as a result of an ongoing outbreak at the Wanaque Center For Nursing And Rehabilitation in New Jersey.

The teams will assess infection prevention practices and deploy beginning in November, according to Health Commissioner Dr. Shereef Elnahal.

Similarly, the states' health department also ensures that it is working very closely with the facility to monitor the illness outbreak, and to ensure that all infection control measures are being followed.

Those affected at the Wanaque center range in age from toddlers to young adults.

The strain found in the rehab center outbreak - type 7 - is among the more potent types and sometimes causes more serious respiratory illness, especially among those with weak immune systems.

A ninth child has died at a New Jersey rehabilitation facility following a viral outbreak. The CDC is also investigating the outbreak.

"The Wanaque Center continues to fully cooperate with these agencies and has sought out their medical guidance with respect to the virus", the facility said.

All nine were in the pediatric unit of the Wanaque Center for Nursing & Rehabilitation in Haskell, Passaic County. "The strain has been particularly associated with disease in communal living arrangements and can be more severe", the department said in a statement.

In rare cases among people with weakened immune systems, the viruses may cause pneumonia or inflammation of the brain and the tissues around it.

The viruses, unlike the flu, are not seasonal and can cause illness throughout the year.

"People know patients are being held prisoner, but they probably think they have bigger battles in public health to fight, so they just have to let this go", Sophie Harman, a global health expert at Queen Mary University of London, said.

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