Acute flaccid myelitis cases investigated across state

Minnesota: Acute flaccid myelitis cases investigated across state

Six cases of a rare, polio-like illness affecting children were reported in Minnesota in the past three weeks, state health officials said. AFM or neurologic conditions like it have a variety of causes such as viruses, environmental toxins, and genetic disorders. "Collecting information about suspected AFM cases is relatively new, and it is voluntary for most states to send this information to CDC". "It's incredibly heartbreaking to see this". And at the end of 2104, total numbers of people affected from AFM were 120 in 34 states. The cause of any individual case of AFM can be hard to determine, and often, no cause is found. CDC specialists will make the final determination if these cases are AFM.

Between August 2014 and August 2018, the CDC received 362 cases of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM).

Quinton has lost a lot of the strength in his left arm, along with some weakness in his legs and neck.

Minnesota officials have not yet identified a particular virus in the six cases there.

In a separate statement, the agency said that it was "aware of several patients in Minnesota who have clinical symptoms" consistent with AFM and that it was "working closely with the Minnesota State Health Department to investigate these cases". They have been reported in 16 states. That was the case with Orville Young, a 4-year-old boy in Minnesota who lost mobility in his right arm and had difficulty sitting up and moving his legs.

Some viruses and germs have been linked to AFM, including common germs that can cause colds and sore throats, and respiratory infections.

Its symptoms are likened to those caused by polio, which was eradicated in the USA thanks to the polio vaccine.

It's always important to practice disease prevention steps, such as staying up-to-date on vaccines, washing your hands, and protecting yourself from mosquito bites.

If you see potential symptoms of AFM in your child-for example, if they are not using their arms properly-the MDH recommends contacting a health care provider as soon as possible.

Experts aren't sure what is causing the increase, but they know the numbers started to go up about four years ago in 2014. Since there is no specific treatment as of yet, neurologists can recommend certain interventions on a case-by-case basis, recommending physical or occupational therapy to help with limb weakness. Acute flaccid myelitis is tricky to diagnose and may require tests of spinal fluid, as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

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