Mother and baby among dead as Hurricane Florence lashes United States coast

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"The storm is wreaking havoc on our state".

Storm surge, torrential rain and high winds over up to 90 miles per hour are stretching for hundreds of miles from the Outer Banks into SC. Tomorrow, forecasters expect it to climb over nine feet.

Blowing ashore with howling 155 km/h winds, Florence splintered buildings, trapped hundreds of people and swamped entire communities along the Carolina coast Friday in what could be just the opening act in a watery, two-part, slow-motion disaster. "We are stuck in the attic". "It's been occurring all night".

Hurricane Florence is battering North Carolina with wild winds and a powerful storm surge.

Next advisory: 2 p.m. Through the day, the storm's pace slowed even more, from 10 miles per hour Thursday morning to 3 miles per hour by Friday evening.

Ken Graham, the NHC's director, warned the slow pace of the storm exacerbated its danger even to areas outside its immediate path. As of Friday morning, Atlantic Beach, a town on the state's Outer Banks barrier islands, already had received 30 inches (76 cm) of rain, the U.S. Geological Service said.

"In Harvey, vibration from wind caused [one] to register rain", said hydrodynamics branch chief Robert Holmes.

"You need to be prepared to be without power for weeks", Holding said, pointing out that Hurricane Fran knocked out power for two weeks and Hurricane Matthew left him without power for five days.

While many sought shelter - about 26,000 people took refuge in 100 shelters and at the 14,000-seat Joel Colisseum in Winston-Salem - others ignored warnings or headed to nearby hotels. Officials said some 1.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia were warned to evacuate, but it was unclear how many did.

Forecasters believe the biggest danger right now is the water, not the wind. More than 60 people had to be rescued in another town as a cinderblock motel collapsed at the height of the storm's fury.

North Carolina alone is forecast to get 9.6 trillion gallons, enough to cover the Tar Heel state to a depth of about 10 inches (25 centimeters). Craven County officials said they responded to 200 calls for help.

An intense wave, as well as heavy rains, will announce on Thursday on the coast of Las Carolinas, the arrival of Florence.

Right now, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Hurricane Center is predicting that Florence will become a tropical storm tomorrow (Sept. 15) over SC, continue northwest to eastern Kentucky, then swing northeast and track over most of New England early next week.

A tornado watch was also in effect for parts of North Carolina.

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