Alzheimer's cases expected to soar in coming decades

Five common misconceptions about Alzheimer's explained

The paper first classifies predictions for Alzheimer's disease by race and ethnicity.

Today, September 21, 2018, is World Alzheimer's Day. Governments have an obligation to support the 50 million people now living with dementia, and their families, which, again, is projected to increase exponentially to 152 million by 2050.

Sawai Man Singh Medical College to have a separate dementia clinic for treatment of Alzheimer's disease at its psychiatric centre in Adarsh Nagar which will be operational from Monday.

It projects Alzheimer's disease will affect nearly 14 million people in a few decades.

"This study shows that as the US population increases, the number of people affected by Alzheimer's disease and related dementias will rise, especially among minority populations", said CDC Director Robert R. Redfield.

Hispanic Americans will likely have the greatest increase due to population growth, but whites will still have the largest total number of Alzheimer's cases.

"This study shows that as the US population increases, the number of people affected by Alzheimer's disease and related dementias will rise, especially among minority populations", CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield added. While Alzheimer's is the fifth leading cause of death for Americans aged 65 years and older, the findings also reveal a racial disparity. Alzheimer's disease kills brain cells, which causes an individual's memory and thinking ability to deteriorate.

The burden of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, which was 1.6% of the USA population in 2014, is projected to double to 3.3% by 2060, reported the CDC's Kevin Matthews, PhD, and and colleagues in Alzheimer's & Dementia. "An early assessment and diagnosis is key to planning for their health care needs, including long-term services and supports, as the disease progresses", said lead author Kevin Matthews, health geographer with the CDC's Division of Population Health. Premature diagnosis seems to be the clue for assisting people and their families survive with dissipation of memory steer the health care system, and propose for their care in the near future. Today is about raising awareness and challenging the stigma associated with Alzheimer's disease. Among Hispanics, 12.2 percent were diagnosed with these conditions, along with 10.3 percent of whites and 9.1 percent of American Indian and Alaska natives.

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