Toddlers getting too much sugar in diet

A recent study by the CDC said many young children are getting too much added sugar

For the 6- to 11-month-olds, 61 percent of the sugar in their diet was added sugar.

Kirsten Herrick, the lead author of the study and a nutritional epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said in a statement that this is the first time the body has looked at how much added sugar children below the age of two eat. "Besides those ending in "ose, ' such as maltose or sucrose", the guidelines say, "other names for sugar include high fructose corn syrup, molasses, cane sugar, corn sweetener, raw sugar, syrup, honey or fruit juice concentrates". In fact, in some cases, babies are consuming more added sugar than the maximum amount recommended for adults.

Ready-to-eat cereals, bakery items, sugar-sweetened beverages, yogurt, and candy can be major sources of added sugar. Overweight children who continue to consume added sugar are more likely to become insulin resistant, a precursor to diabetes.

But the earlier sugar intake begins, the harder the habit becomes to kick later in life.

Now, according to the CDC, all these pediatric illnesses are triggered by a higher added sugar consumption than normal in toddlers across the United States and the experts recommend parent to avoid feeding their children with products that are known to contain added sugar, such as sweetened cereals, candies, sweet sodas, fruity yogurts, and so on.

Moreover, the oldest children in the study, between the age of 19 to 23 months, consumed an average of around seven teaspoons of added sugar each day, which is more than the amount of sugar present in a Kit Kat bar, the findings of the study showed.

In the survey, researchers instructed parents to write down what they fed their children in a 24-hour period.

Almost every toddler consumed added sugar.

Consumption of added sugar among Americans has been a widely discussed subject. Previous research suggests most Americans exceed those limits. But they do suggest adults avoid exceeding more than 12 teaspoons of added sugar each day, based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

"The easiest way to reduce added sugars in your own diet and your kids' diet is to choose foods that you know don't have them, like fresh fruits and vegetables", Herrick said.

"Once kids start eating table food, they're often eating the same types of foods that Mom and Dad have in their diet, and other research has demonstrated that adults exceed recommendations for added sugar too", said Herrick.

Parents can expect recommendations for young children to be in place for the 2020-2025 DGA guidelines, but for now, less added sugar should always be the goal. But by the time children reached between 1 and 2 years old, that amount was even higher: 98 to 99 percent of the sugar those children ate was added.

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