DUP to back Theresa May over Brexit amendments

UK Labour MPs Worried by Govt's EEA Deal With EU - Frontbencher

Theresa May could claim her first victory in a long time, as parts of the Brexit withdrawal bill are being voted by the UK Parliament, and several Tories have made a decision to accept the government's view.

Justice minister Phillip Lee is the first minister to resign over the government's Brexit policy.

Remain-supporting Conservative MPs had threatened to defeat the government on an amendment to the bill which would have given Parliament a wide-ranging veto to May's Brexit deal, or even force a second referendum.

The opposition Labour Party wants to force the government to negotiate a Brexit deal where the United Kingdom retains "full access" to the EU's single market and that would ensure "no new impediments" to trade.

But Solicitor General Robert Buckland publicly implied that Government would be accepting part of Grieve's amendment, and said that a "structured discussion" would take place with rebels.

This change sought to give greater powers to the "sifting committee", which would be established to decide whether recommendations proposed by ministers to amend retained European Union law after Brexit would require a Commons vote.

Mr Grieve withdrew his own amendment, which would have given MPs powers to dictate what the Government should do if no acceptable agreement is reached by February 2019.

"The reason for that is that the House of Commons if it sets out indications for how the Government should negotiate, it's a very inflexible body for doing that".

One says: "If we do not get what we were promised the Government will be defeated after we have amended the Bill in the Lords".

Another flashpoint could come when lawmakers vote Wednesday on an amendment seeking to keep Britain in a customs union with the EU.

In a concession, the government promised that lawmakers would have a say on what to do next if there is no agreement with the European Union, or if Parliament rejects the deal offered.

Opposition Labour lawmaker Chuka Umunna had earlier accused Britain's tabloids of intimidation, holding up Tuesday's edition of the eurosceptic Daily Express.

"It would be the end of the Conservative party if they succeed", he said.

The Daily Express, another pro-Brexit tabloid, issued a thinly-veiled threat to lawmakers, saying they should "Ignore the will of the people at [their] peril".

It is believed the deal will see parliament playing a bigger role in Brexit negotiations if there is no deal by November 30 this year.

Only 15 minutes was set aside for debating changes to devolved powers proposed by the Lords in the EU Withdrawal bill.

'The objective of the EU Withdrawal Bill is simple - it is putting EU legislation into law to ensure a smooth and orderly transition as we leave, ' she is expected to tell them.

Related:

Comments


Other news