US, UK, France bomb Syria over chemical attack

France says analysis points to Syria behind Douma gas attack

British Prime Minister Theresa May will face criticism on Monday for bypassing parliament to join weekend air strikes against Syria, with some lawmakers calling for a potentially damaging vote on her future strategy.

May said the missile strike was created to minimize any civilian casualties and was not an attempt to change the Syrian government.

"Important infrastructure was destroyed which will result in a setback for the Syrian regime", Mattis said.

The three countries consulted and collaborated on an assault in which more than a 100 missiles, reportedly targeting specific sites, were launched into Syria after the government was accused of a chemical attack.

But she will be grilled over why she broke with a convention to seek parliamentary approval for the action, a decision that she and her ministers say was driven by the need to act quickly. "Let these united actions send a clear message to the regime - the use of chemical weapons is categorically unacceptable and you will be held to account".

The Russian Foreign Ministry slammed those allegations as a bogus story, while Russia's Defense Ministry pointed out that the White Helmets were not a reliable source of information as they were known for spreading fabricated news.

Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the main opposition Labour Party, has questioned the legal basis for Britain's involvement.

British jets fired missiles at a Syrian military base suspected of holding chemical weapons ingredients on Saturday in Britain's first military action against President Bashar al-Assad's regime.

May is not obliged to win parliament's approval before ordering military action, but a non-binding constitutional convention to do so has been established since a 2003 vote on joining the US -led invasion of Iraq.

The DUP has backed Prime Minister Theresa May's decision to authorise air strikes in Syria.

However, May is facing questions over the legality of committing United Kingdom forces to any US -led attack on Syria.

Professor Iain Begg, Research Fellow at the European Institute and Co-Director of the Dahrendorf Forum at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), told Xinhua: "A volley of bombs may help the USA and its allies feel they have reacted in a timely and proportionate manner to the undoubted horror of the use by the Syrian regime of chemical weapons, but the inevitable worry will be that they have not thought through what happens next".

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