United Kingdom joins Syria air strikes in response to chemical attack

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a press conference at 10 Downing Street in London on the air strikes against Syria Saturday

Konashenkov said that Russian Federation knew "for sure" that between April 3-6, the White Helmets - a group which helps civilians in opposition-held territory in Syria - were "under severe pressure specifically from London to produce as quickly as possible this pre-planned provocation".

"I want to state categorically ... that Britain has no involvement and would never have any involvement in the use of a chemical weapon", she said, the Guardian reported.

This is the first time as Prime Minister that I have had to take the decision to commit our armed forces in combat - and it is not a decision I have taken lightly.

US President Donald Trump addresses the nation on the situation in Syria April 13, 2018 at the White House in Washington, DC.

President Vladimir Putin has said Russian Federation will call an emergency session of the UN Security Council over air strikes on Syria. Western governments, including Britain, blamed the government of Bashar al-Assad, a Russian ally, for the attack.

A statement by French President Emmanuel Macron said many people were killed or injured in the suspected chemical attack.

The strikes were launched in response to alleged chemical weapons attacks that President Donald Trump labelled as "crimes of a monster" and US Defence officials have said that both US ships and aircraft were used in the strikes.

"This collective action sends a clear message that the worldwide community will not stand by and tolerate the use of chemical weapons", May told a press conference.

I have done so because I judge this action to be in Britain's national interest.

Correspondents from the British and world press also asked the prime minister to explain what role can the Parliament play in making a decision to attack another sovereign country.

Iranian President Rouhani says US-led military strikes in Syria will cause "destruction" in the Middle East.

May held an emergency cabinet meeting to discuss possible action on Thursday and there had been calls for the British parliament to be consulted before any air strikes.

Polls in recent days have shown public wariness of military intervention in Syria, with Britain still haunted by its participation in the US-led invasion of Iraq.

Meanwhile, Britain's main opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn described the USA -led military strikes on Syria jointly staged by three leading Western countries as a "legally questionable action", saying that the British government should "not taking instructions from Washington".

"This legally questionable action risks escalating further.an already devastating conflict", he said, adding that May should have sought parliamentary approval.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon also said the strikes risked "dangerous escalation".

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