First Rohingya family repatriated to Myanmar

UN blacklists Myanmar military for sexual violence

The stateless Muslim minority have been massing in squalid refugee camps across the border in Bangladesh since the Myanmar army launched a brutal campaign against the community in northern Rakhine state in August.

In February, Bangladesh released a list of more than 8,000 Rohingya for repatriation.

The conditions in Myanmar are not yet conducive for the safe and dignified return of Rohingya refugees to their homes, the United Nations refugee agency said, underlining that the responsibility for creating such conditions remains with the countrys authorities.

Burma has strongly denied that allegation - saying the army had waged a legitimate operation against insurgent Rohingya militants who had attacked more than two dozen police posts and an army base in August.

Bangladesh and Myanmar agreed a repatriation plan in January but its start has been repeatedly delayed as both sides blame the other for lack of preparation.

Photos posted alongside the statement showed one man, two women, a young girl and a boy receiving the ID cards and getting health checks. After months of delays, five members of a Rohingya family on Thursday went back to Rakhine.

The Rohingya exodus has created a humanitarian crisis in Bangladesh, a small, poor country that is one of the most densely populated in the world.

"The five members of a family came back to Taungpyoletwei town repatriation camp in Rakhine state this morning", according to the governments Information Committee.

It is being said, the family members were issued National Verification Cards (NVCs) upon entering Myanmar.

The agreement, signed by UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi and Bangladesh Foreign Secretary Md Shahidul Haque, established a framework of cooperation between UNHCR and Bangladesh on the safe, voluntary, and dignified returns of refugees in line with worldwide standards.

"I hope, Myanmar will repatriate all the families within the possible shortest time", the home minister said.

During the visit, Win announced that Myanmar is ready for the repatriation of Rohingya.

Last week, the most senior United Nations official to visit Myanmar this year, the assistant secretary general for humanitarian affairs, Ursula Mueller, said conditions in Myanmar were not conducive to the return of the refugees.

Waves of violence have forced Rohingya out of Burma over the past several years, with more than 200,000 Rohingya refugees already in Bangladesh before last year's exodus.

"Before proceeding with the repatriation of Rohingya, the Myanmar government must recognise and guarantee all their fundamental human rights", he told the news agency.

A newly arrived Rohingya refugee mother feeds her daughter at a transit camp in Nayaprar refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

A Rohingya community leader confirmed to AFP news agency the return of the family.

Meanwhile boats carrying Rohingya from Rakhine state continue to leave Burma.

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