Boy unearths lost treasure of 10th century Danish king

King Harald Bluetooth

When a silvery glint caught their eye, they thought it was a piece of tin foil, but a closer look revealed that it was a piece of silver, The Guardian reported. Archaeologists believe the riches belonged to the Danish king Harald Gormsson, more commonly known as "Bluetooth", who ruled from about A.D.

Harald Bluetooth. "This treasure is the largest single find of Bluetooth coins in the southern Baltic Sea area and thus of outstanding importance", said excavation leader Michael Schirren of the German State Office for Culture and Historic Preservation.

"This was the (biggest) discovery of my life", hobby archaeologist Rene Schoen told the German news agency dpa.

The entire treasure was uncovered by experts last weekend, the Mecklenburg-West Pomerania state archaeology office said.

However, they were then invited to participate in the dig.

The excavation uncovered more than 600 coins and pieces of silver, including, jewelry, neck rings, brooches, pearls and a Thor's hammer dating back to the late 10th century. Back in 2015, a man discovered Roman-era coins, mosaic glassware, and hobnails from a pair of shoes and last year, four 2,000 year gold torques were unearthed in England.

At that time Harald was at war with his son, Sweyn Forkbeard, so it is surmised that the hoard was buried by the king in his flight.

Among the discoveries were several silver coins bearing images of a Christian cross, believed by historians to be among Denmark's first independent coins.

"We have here the rare case of a discovery that appears to corroborate historical sources", archaeologist Detlef Jantzen said.

It inspired the name of Bluetooth technology invented by Swedish telecom company Ericsson. It is in his honor that the Bluetooth wireless communication technology has been named.

The logo is made up of the two ancient runes spelling out his initials HB.

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