Queen's bra fitter Rigby & Peller stripped of royal warrant

Queen Elizabeth II

The underwear company supplied lingerie to the Queen, the Daily Mail reported.

June Kenton, 82, who is still on the board of the company, published her memoirs entitled "Storm in a D-Cup" a year ago but said there was "nothing" in it that should have caused offence to the royals.

The British royal family is facing some drama this week as Queen Elizabeth has symbolically denounced her former bra fitter (or "corsetiere", to be official).

June Kenton, director of the London-based firm, published Storm in a D Cup in March a year ago.

"Rigby & Peller is deeply saddened by this decision and is not able to elaborate further on the cancellation out of respect for her Majesty the Queen and the Royal Warrant Holders Association".

The palace have not commented on the warrant.

June Kenton and her husband Harold bought Rigby & Peller, then an independent shop on London's South Molton Street, for £20,000 in 1982. She sold her stake in 2011, but remained on the board and continued to work with the royal family.

"I've had the royal warrant for so long I never imagined that this would happen", Kenton added, according to The Telegraph.

While the company has held the United Kingdom royal warrant since 1960, she only took over the role in the 1980s.

Rigby & Peller has now had to remove the royal coat of arms from its store front and website, following a "grace period" granted to them for long-service to the Queen.

The bra-fitter described carrying out bra-fittings with the Queen, stating that royal was half-dressed and her famous corgis were present at the time. "I gave her posters of models in lingerie and swimwear for them to put up in their studies at Eton".

Ms Kenton insists her autobiography was no tell-all book.

"I'm very sad Buckingham Palace took exception to the story - it's a kind and gentle story about what went on in my life", she said.

"Shall I tell you what I do?" she was quoted as saying. It's just upsetting at the end of my life, but what can I do. "I can't fight with Buckingham Palace and I wouldn't want to, but it's hard".

Kenton, 82, also claimed that the Queen Mum once confided in her that she would only "pretend to listen" to her daughter, Princess Margaret, whenever Margaret would offer her mother style advice about hats.

Harrods chose not to apply to have their warrant renewed in 2000 when Mohamed al-Fayed made a decision to end the store's links to the royal family following the death of his son, Dodi, and Princess Diana.

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