Lubaina Himid becomes first woman of color to win Turner Prize

Lubaina Himid becomes the oldest winner and first black woman to win Turner Prize

The victor is Lubaina Himid, an artist, and art teacher born in Zanzibar, Tanzania, 63 years ago, whose colorful paintings stand out for treating racism and the legacies of slavery.

Accepting her prize, Himid began by thanking the people of Hull, saying: "First of all to the people who stopped me to wish well".

Speaking about the age limit being increased before the victor was announced Alex Farquharson, director of Tate Britain and chairman of the jury, said: "The Turner Prize has always championed emerging artists - it has never been a prize for long service but for a memorable presentation of work in that year".

And what's more, unlike the other three artists on this year's shortlist, Himid doesn't work and live in London, or any other European capital. They admired her expansive and exuberant approach to painting, which combines satire and a sense of theater.

The Turner Prize award money is 40,000 pounds ($54,000), with 25,000 pounds going to the victor and 5,000 pounds each for the other short-listed artists.

Lubaina Himid has been crowned this year's Turner Prize victor, beating Rosalind Nashashibi, Hurvin Anderson, and Andrea Buttner to take home the £25,000 prize money. Himid's work challenges the stereotypical depictions of black figures in art history, foregrounding the contribution of the African diaspora to Western culture.

Working across painting, installation, drawing and printmaking, and bringing both old and new work together, her work is both visually arresting and critical.

Founded in 1984 and named after English 19th century landscape painter J.M.W. Turner, the Prize is the UK's most high-profile visual arts award. Previously it had been used as a platform to promote the work of younger artists.

The jury was led by the Tate Britain director Alex Farquharson and included the Frieze editor Dan Fox, the critic Martin Herbert, the Walker Art Center scholar Mason Leaver-Yap and the The Showroom director Emily Pethick.

Tuesday night was a historical moment for the world of contemporary art.

Judges from Tate Britain praised her various projects - including the solo exhibitions Lubaina Himid: Invisible Strategies and Navigation Charts - for raising "questions of personal and political identity".

The exhibition of the four shortlisted artists at Ferens Art Gallery in Hull has already been seen by more than 90,000 visitors, making it one of the most popular Turner Prize shows outside London.

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