European Union sues member states over migrant relocation failure

EU sues Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland over low refugee intake

They will be referred to the European Court of Justice for "non-compliance with their legal obligations on relocation", the commission said in a statement, referring to the three countries' staunch refusal to take part in an EU scheme forcing migrants on unwilling nations. The EU's executive Commission sought reasons why but was given no satisfactory explanations.

The Luxembourg-based ECJ could impose heavy fines.

The move was an attempt to relieve pressure on Greece and Italy where the vast majority of migrants were arriving.

For Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic this legal precedent - not news, but a logical effect.

If the member state still refuses to comply, the Commission may then decide to refer the case to the Court of Justice.

The Commission has launched legal action against the three member states earlier this year, sending them a "Letter of Formal Notice" in June and a "Reasoned Opinion" in July.

Following Thursday's announcement, Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis told the BBC his country would continue to oppose the relocation scheme.

In 2015 European Union states agreed to relocate 160,000 asylum-seekers between them based on the size and wealth of each country, however, Romania, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary voted against accepting mandatory quotas.

Responding to the move, Poland's Deputy Foreign Minister Konrad Szymanski said his nation "is ready to defend its position in the Court", and declared: "No one will lift the duty of providing public safety from the Polish government".

The Commission has also made a decision to file a lawsuit in the European court of justice against Hungary adopted in this country, the laws on non-governmental organizations and higher education.

Hungary has introduced an education law that could shut the Soros-founded Central University in Budapest, which has always been seen as a hostile bastion of liberalism by Orban's right-wing government.

In both cases, Hungary has failed to address European Union concerns about the laws or amend the legislation to bring it in line with European Union standards.

We will remind, recently the Prime Minister of Hungary Viktor Orban said that Central Europe is the last place on the continent, "free migrants".

The European Commission said that the laws on foreign non-governmental organisations "indirectly discriminate and disproportionately restrict donations from overseas to civil society organisations".

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