Saudi says coalition will begin reopening Yemen air and seaports

French President Emmanuel Macron gestures during a news conference in Dubai

A new political crisis gripping the Middle East has destroyed the relative peace of Lebanon's coalition government, ruled - until just days ago - by Prime Minister Saad Hariri, after his stunning November 4 resignation that was announced from within Saudi Arabia, where he remains as of this moment.

"Lebanon's issues are related to the Lebanese themselves and we will not interfere in Lebanon's issues and based on our principled policies, we never interfere in other countries' internal affairs", Qassemi told reporters in his weekly press conference in Tehran on Monday.

The race turned into a political rally, with numerous runners calling for the return of Hariri, who has not publicly spoken since unexpectedly announcing his resignation. He said he would return to Lebanon within two or three days.

The comments came in Hariri's first TV interview since his resignation announcement, in which he lashed out harshly at Hezbollah and its patron Iran.

"My resignation came as a wake-up call for Lebanon", he said. Hariri explained after the break that the man was one of his staff, telling him of the latest developments in Lebanon. He added that anything Hariri has said or may say "does not reflect reality" due to the mystery of his situation. Before his resignation on November 4, he led a 30-member government that included Hezbollah.

Hariri said on Sunday he would return to Lebanon "within days" to resolve issues with the militant group Hezbollah, his rivals in a coalition government formed past year.

Saudi Arabia has stepped up its rhetoric against Hezbollah and Iran, accusing both of supporting Shiite rebels in Yemen. Then, when an natural disaster was reported in Iraq and Iran, she referenced it, telling Hariri it was to make sure people believed the interview was live.

He added that a marathon planned in Beirut on Sunday in which tens of thousands are expected to participate should be "a national sports demonstration for solidarity with Prime Minister Hariri and his return to his country". Once he returns, Aoun tweeted, "we will listen to him about all circumstances, topics and concerns that need addressing".

"I am freely in the Kingdom, and if I want to travel tomorrow, I will travel". She first read the time from her phone and then reported to Hariri developments in Lebanon, including protests. "You made me exhausted", he said.

Ibrahim al-Masri, a 37-year-old Hariri supporter, said the Lebanese didn't know if it was Hariri's choice to stay in Saudi Arabia.

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