Here's how long you have left to spend your old £10 notes

Old £10 note to disappear next year

The Bank of England warns if you still have any old £10 notes with Charles Darwin, better spend them before 1 March next year, otherwise, it'll transform into the souvenir.

A use by date of March 1 has been slapped on the paper notes following the introduction of the plastic tenner on September 14.

Bank of England governor Mark Carney said about the notes: "The new £10 will be printed on polymer, making it safer, stronger and cleaner". As of October this year, 55% of the £10 notes in circulation were made from polymer, while 359 million were paper.

Its days have been numbered since the new polymer tenner, depicting author Jane Austen, entered circulation in September.

After the introduction of the jazzy new plastic tenner, the Bank of England has revealed the date the old, paper version will stop being legal tender.

Despite the vegans' protests, the note with Jane Austen also has an inscription in raised dots that help blind and partially-sighted users to identify them.

The transition to polymer has sparked controversy after the Bank confirmed that an "extremely small amount" of tallow, or animal fat, was used to produce polymer pellets, which were part of the production process for creating the notes.

As well as its strength and anti-counterfeit properties, the new note is also believed to last two-and-a-half times longer than paper notes, meaning they are more environmentally friendly.

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