'White Widow' British ISIL recruiter 'killed in air strike'

It was previously claimed Jones was using Hamza as human shield in an attempt to stop the US from carrying out a similar strike on her

British IS recruiter Sally-Anne Jones, dubbed the White Widow, has reportedly been killed in a United States drone strike.

However, it was kept secret on both sides of the Atlantic over fears her 12-year-old son Jojo may have also died in the blast.

USA intelligence chiefs were quoted as saying they could not be 100 percent certain that Jones had been killed as there was no way of recovering any DNA from the ground, but they were "confident" she was dead.

Jones had been going under the name Umm Hussain al-Britani, and issued threats against the United Kingdom from her twitter account, urging Muslim women to launch terrorist attacks during Ramadan.

Junaid Hussain died in August 2015, with the extent of his involvement in planning terror plots coming to light.

The reported death has yet to be confirmed by official channels.

She was active as an online recruiter and sometimes posted propaganda messages on social media, including a striking photograph of herself dressed as a nun pointing a gun towards the camera.

Despite this, Sky News was told in June that the jihadist was not happy in Syria and wanted to return to Britain.

It is feared the 12-year-old son of Britain's most wanted woman may have been killed in the same drone strike that reportedly killed her in June.

She frequently used her Twitter to spread propaganda for ISIS and in the past had spoken of her wish to behead a Western prisoner in Syria and kill Christians with a "blunt knife".

A British woman who was a key recruiting figure for Isis and who became a notorious hate figure in her home country has reportedly been killed by a missile strike by American forces on the Iraq/Syria border.

"If you take out those who are high value target women it is going to have an impact at the operation level of IS". "We don't know for sure whether he was with her or not".

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