Kaepernick tells CBS he'll stand during national anthem

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick who was at the forefront of protests last season told CBS on Sunday he will stand during the U.S. national anthem if given a chance to play football in NFL again

He sat, and subsequently kneeled, during the playing of the national anthem to draw attention to the behaviour of some police officers when dealing with suspects of colour.

La Canfora said on Twitter he was relaying other reports about the athlete's plans for demonstrations, not referring to their conversation specifically. It was before Charlottesville, and before Trump said kneeling players were sons of bitches, and before Kaepernick's fellow football players took up his cause in large numbers. "He's planning on standing for the anthem if given the opportunity", La Canfora said on video.

With that in mind, Kaepernick reportedly reaffirmed that he will now stand for the national anthem.

Furthermore, Kaepernick tweeted a series of tweets questioning the CBS report.

But Jason La Canfora of CBS Sports reported on Sunday morning that Kaepernick has in fact been training to make a comeback and that his representation is speaking with teams around the league. I didn't ask him if he would sit or stand.

La Canfora's report was picked up by several news outlets, including the Associated Press.

While there have been opportunities for Kaepernick to catch on with teams who have run into unexpected quarterback issues, other options who at times have been less qualified have been chosen over him.

Kaepernick, making use of a quote that may or may not have originally been coined by Winston Churchill, said: "A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its trousers on".

Kaepernick himself retweeted posts that La Canfora's report was false, and later, a quote he attributed to Winston Churchill about lies.

Kaepernick remains a free agent since opting out of his contract with the San Francisco 49ers in March.

Kaepernick sparked a series of protests by National Football League players upset by police brutality and racial inequality.

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