Is dressing sexy the cause of sexual harassment?

Mayim Bialik

Defender Michael Leon wrote that "by attacking Bialik ... people are both denying the reality of her experience, which includes a narrative of facing discrimination in Hollywood for not fitting the traditional stereotype of a female actress, and dealing with self-esteem issues, and refusing to engage in the valid substance of the piece". As of now, about 40 women have spoken out about being victimized by Weinstein, celebrities and film-industry personnel included. In the piece, Bialik says she has rarely experienced sexual harassment in the workplace in part because she doesn't flash her sexuality and try to be a "perfect ten".

Obviously people were not super impressed by this, with dozens of high-profile women calling Bialik out for her BS on Twitter.

The former child star said that: 'As a proud feminist with little desire to diet, get plastic surgery or hire a personal trainer, I have nearly no personal experience with men asking me to meetings in their hotel rooms'. "I support these women as we seek out and demand accountability from the only ones responsible for assault and rape: the people who perpetrate these heinous crimes".

Bialik's assertions that the victims of predatory men are mostly pretty women who dress and act immodestly lit up social media, drawing the ire of other women who describe themselves as feminists.

"I applaud the bravery of the women who have come forward", Bialik continued.

CSI star Arquette responded: "Thank you for saying that. It's not the clothes".

Actress and neuroscientist Mayim Bialik speaks at a L.A. conference in 2016.

Bialik described the insecurities she felt growing up in show business as a "prominent-nosed, awkward, geeky, Jewish 11-year-old".

In a statement, she held herself out to be a victim of "the Hollywood machine" that took her words and twisted them "out of context".

'Nothing has been a harsher reminder that I work in an industry that profits on the exploitation of women - and not just on screen - than the accusations of Harvey Weinstein as a serial sexual assaulter, particularly of aspiring young actresses, ' the San Diego native wrote.

And on Monday, Bialik hosted a Facebook Live event to discuss her piece and its pushback.

Read her original Times contribution, "Being a Feminist in Harvey Weinstein's World,".

"There is no way to avoid being the victim of assault by what you wear or the way you behave", she said in the video.

Bialik wrote in the piece published Friday that she makes choices to be "self-protecting and wise", like dressing modestly and not acting flirtatiously.

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