Senate Unanimously Passes Resolution Condemning Hate Groups

S. Carolina Sen. Tim Scott to discuss Charlottesville response with Trump

Trump has been criticised for his response to the violence and rally, in which he asserted there were good people on "both sides" and bemoaned rising efforts to remove Confederate monuments as an attack on United States "history and culture".

Washington, Sep 13 (IANS): The US Congress has urged President Donald Trump in a joint resolution to publicly condemn white supremacists and other hate groups and address the threats posed by them. Heyer was killed when James Fields rammed his auto into her and others on August 12, 2017, in Charlottesville, Virginia, during a white supremacist rally and counter-protest.

Monday's resolution, which was passed with unanimous support, describes the killing as a "domestic terrorist attack".

The President took nearly 48 hours to speak out against the neo-Nazis, white supremacists and the Ku Klux Klan, who were all present in Charlottesville on that day. Thomas Garrett, R-Va., and Gerald Connolly, D-Va., and co-sponsored by the other members of the Virginia House delegation.

"The first thing it's going to do is give some real comfort for these families", Kaine said, referring to the deaths of Heyer and two Virginia State Police troopers who had been patrolling the rally in a helicopter that later crashed. If the House of Representatives adopts it as well, the joint resolution will be sent to President Trump for his signature. The resolution passed both chambers without debate.

"No. 2, I think it's great for [Democrats and Republicans] to be able to make a moral call that white supremacy's not acceptable, and I want the president to have to sign it", he added.

The resolution calls for the attorney general to cooperate with the Department of Homeland Security secretary to investigate "all acts of violence, intimidation and domestic terrorism" from far-right groups and monitor and improve the process of reporting hate crimes.

Trump initially blamed the violence in Charlottesville on "many sides", leading to condemnation from both Democrats and Republicans. "POTUS should sign a clear message & sign it ASAP", tweeted Sen. He then issued a statement from the White House declaring that "racism is evil" and called out the KKK, Nazis and other hate groups.

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