Gorakhpur tragedy: Guilty will not be spared says CM

An child suffering from Japanese Encephalitis lies on a bed at The Baba Raghav Das Medical College in Gorakhpur

However, documents obtained by the Post show that the hospital was in tens of thousands of debt, and that the agreement between the hospital and the oxygen supplier ran out about a week before the shortage.

Rautela said that the hospital owed 6.8 million rupees (£81,900) to the company, but added that it had adequate numbers of oxygen cylinders.

The Chief Minister, who was supposed to visit the flood ravaged areas of Bahraich and Barabanki, cancelled his programme and flew to Gorakhpur with Union Health Minister JP Nadda to get a first hand account of the tragic deaths of 69 children in the last six days.

Tandon said, "The oxygen supplier company claims that it had approached the health department to inform about the dues for which Baba Raghav Das Medical College were provided with the required funds but the supplier later claimed that the funds were transferred on August 11". "He is in constant touch with authorities from the Central and UP governments", said a tweet from the Prime Minister's Office handle. Both the opposition parties in the state have made a decision to send teams to Gorakhpur.

When Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath visited the BRD Medical College Hospital on Sunday at 1.30 pm, a man named Sunil Pandey was caught in the rush even as he faced a medical emergency.

Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath at the Baba Raghav Das Hospital in Gorakhpur.

It is further mentioned that total 124 deaths were reported in the Gorakhpur hospital till 8th August 2017. The aspect of oxygen failure will be probed by a committee headed by the UP chief secretary.

Yogi added that Prime Minister Narendra Modi had expressed concern over the deaths and was constantly monitoring the situation.

His comment came in the backdrop of strident criticism of the minister by opposition parties which demanded his resignation.

'We saw our baby struggling to breathe and we couldn't do anything, ' Mr Gautam said.

According to media reports, the hospital began to panic, the relatives of the patients helped the health workers to manually maintain artificial respiration.

Encephalitis outbreaks kill hundreds in India every year, especially during the monsoon season. She was admitted to the hospital at 12.30 am on Thursday and was all right till the time she was getting proper oxygen supply, but her body turned cold and stiff after it was replaced with the ambu bag.

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