Danish submarine sub owner accused over journalist's death

The submarine was Madsen's third attempt at building such a structure and was the largest privately built submarine in the world at the time of its launch in 2008

"So far it hasn't been possible to see what there is inside the submarine", it said.

A Danish court ordered the owner of an amateur-built submarine Saturday held in pre-trial detention for 24 days while police investigate the disappearance of a Swedish journalist who had been on the ship before it sank.

The police in Sweden said they had tried without success to contact her by phone and that her family had not heard from her.

Madsen said "a minor problem with a ballast tank" — a compartment that holds water to provide stability — "turned into a major issue" that ultimately caused the submarine to sink.

Peter Madsen was arrested Friday on preliminary manslaughter charges after his 40-ton, almost 18-meter-long (60-foot-long) ship, named the UC3 Nautilus, sank off Denmark's eastern coast.

The Sweden-born freelance journalist studied at the Sorbonne university in Paris, the London School of Economics and at Columbia University in NY, where she graduated with a master's degree in journalism in 2013.

"I am fine, but sad because Nautilus went down", Madsen told Denmark's TV2 channel, which aired footage of him getting off what appeared to be a private boat and giving a thumbs-up sign.

Peter Madsen, 46, was arrested on preliminary manslaughter charges on Friday after he was rescued from his home-made submarine when it sank off Denmark's eastern coast.

Kristian Isbak tells The Associated Press he had responded to the Navy's call to help locate the submarine on Friday when he spotted Madsen.

The submarine, UC3 Nautilus, is one of three constructed by Madsen.

Isbak says he then saw Madsen swim over to another private boat. The navy says that the 40-ton, almost 18-meter-long (60-foot-long) submarine with at least two people on board had been "found sailing" south of Copenhagen.

The woman's boyfriend alerted authorities that the submarine was missing early on Friday.

"It took about 30 seconds for Nautilus to sink, and I couldn't close any hatches or anything", he said.

According to a timeline compiled by police, on Thursday at about 7 p.m. local time (1700 UTC), the sub departed Refshale Island, a former industrial shipyard transformed into a creative hub, for what was supposed to be a short trip.

The hearing starts at 1200 GMT.

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