UAE pinpoints Qatar stalemate at its extremist ideology

Report: UAE Hacked Qatar Government, Social Media Websites

Qatar accused the United Arab Emirates on Monday of violating worldwide law after reports suggested Abu Dhabi orchestrated the hacking of the Qatari official news agency and social media sites.

Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt and Bahrain in early June cut off diplomatic relations, severed air, land and sea links with Qatar and ordered Qatari citizens to leave their countries within two weeks.

Qatari officials said the agency had been hacked by an "unknown entity" and that the story had "no basis whatsoever".

Senior UAE officials discussed the plan on May 23, according to newly analysed information collected by U.S. intelligence agencies, the report said. It said in a statement Monday that the Post report "unequivocally proves that this hacking crime took place".

Qatar said its emir had never given the speech, and that the story had been planted electronically, but its allies were outraged, and one of the most serious feuds in years between Western-aligned Gulf states began.

The officials said it was unclear if the UAE hacked the websites or paid for them to be carried out, the newspaper reported.

The alleged statements sparked a major ongoing dispute between Qatar and several other major Arab powers. The bogus remarks were reported by Saudi-supporting media.

"What we really do want is we either reach an agreement and Qatar's behaviour changes, or Qatar makes its own bed and they can move on and we can move with a new relationship".

The Federal Bureau of Investigation was previously known to be working with Qatar to probe the hacking.

Gargash said the UAE would not ask foreign companies to choose between doing business with it or Qatar, but suggested worldwide monitoring of Qatar was needed.

The US State Department declined comment in response to a Reuters query. His visit had yielded little except for a bilateral agreement between the U.S. and Qatar to fight "terrorism".

He pointed out that "the current crisis of dimensions beyond the domestic arena of the GCC (Gulf co-operation council)", noting the "need to put an end to official support for extremism and jihadism and terrorism in various parts of the Arab world".

Qatar has acknowledged providing assistance to Islamist groups designated as terrorist organisations by some of its neighbours, notably the Muslim Brotherhood. They presented Qatar with a list of 13 wide-ranging demands and gave it an ultimatum to comply with them or face unspecified consequences.

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