NHS services recovering from cyber-attack

At least 100000 groups in 150 countries hit by ransomware

The spread of the program across National Health Service (NHS) computers forced doctors to switch to pen and paper and continued to affect care days after it initially hit.

The NHS has been declared "open for business" but some hospitals are still suffering disruption caused by the crippling ransomware attack.

More than 200 000 victims in 150 countries and regions were afflicted by the attacks with Russian Federation and the United Kingdom the worst hit.

Dozens of state-run NHS hospitals were hit by a global cyber attack last Friday, many closing their doors to emergency cases and cancelling life-saving operations and routine appointments. In December it was reported that nearly all NHS trusts were using an obsolete version of Windows that Microsoft had stopped providing security updates for in April 2014.

He highlighted that the government had invested £50 million in supporting NHS IT networks during its last strategic defense and security review, and insisted that individual trusts were well-equipped to ensure they could protect themselves against cyber-attack.

Twitter users around the world posted complaints about their computers shutting down and posted photos of the ransom demands on their computer screens. Security agencies in affected countries were racing to find out. -National Security Agency for its own intelligence-gathering purposes and later leaked online.

Because the attack occurred on Friday, right before people left their offices and went home for the weekend, many computers weren't affected because they simply weren't in use.

"While the spread of the Ransomware appears to have temporarily slowed, it is still critical that businesses and individuals patch the operating systems on their computers", the centre said in a statement on its website yesterday.

Once your system has ransomware, your choices are limited: pay or don't pay. Unfortunately, the patch won't help computers that are already infected.

That said, a hacker could remove the domain and try the ransomware attack again, reports CNN.

After Friday's attack took advantage of unpatched vulnerabilities in Microsoft's older Windows operating systems, the US-based software giant slammed governments late Sunday for failing to prepare, saying the attack should be a "wake-up call" to them. Something more focused with knowledge of NHS systems could have done something much worse.

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