Labour MP says her party is not trying to win election

Antonio Tajani and Theresa May

Britain is set to go to the polls on June 8 after an overwhelming majority of MPs backed Prime Minister Theresa May's call to hold a general election on that date.

Rejecting the PM's claim that an election is needed to prevent disunity at Westminster undermining a Brexit deal, Mr Corbyn said: "There is no obstacle to the Government negotiating, but, instead of getting on with the job, she is painting herself as the prisoner of the Liberal Democrats".

The Scottish National Party (SNP) has signalled its MPs will abstain in the vote and Labour and the Liberal Democrats, while accusing May of political opportunism, have welcomed the prospect of an early election.

The next general election had been expected in 2020, but the Fixed Term Parliaments Act allows for one to be held earlier if two-thirds of MPs back the move.

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron said that, for Ms May, calling the election is "the political equivalent of taking candy from a baby". "That's what this is about, it's about asking the people to trust me, to trust us in government, to give us that mandate to go and get that really good deal for the United Kingdom".

Parliament will vote Wednesday on holding a June 8 election.

May had opposed the idea of a snap poll since she came to office following the resignation of her Conservative Party predecessor David Cameron over Brexit.

The Sun, Britain's top-selling newspaper, splashed the headline "Blue Murder" - a reference to the Conservatives' colour branding and the prospect of Labour losing dozens of seats.

Parliament subsequently gave its approval on Wednesday afternoon, meaning the next parliamentary vote will now take place three years earlier than anticipated - and just a month after the Surrey County Council elections on May 4.

Now that lawmakers have approved the election, Parliament will be dissolved at midnight on May 2, 25 working days before election day.

Tusk will chair a summit of the other 27 European Union national leaders in Brussels on April 29, where he expects them to agree negotiating guidelines he has proposed.

"We won't be doing television debates", May said, adding that politicians should spend election campaigns "out and about" meeting voters.

The Prime Minister argued that opposition towards Brexit could prove disastrous for the negotiations, and future of the country and in light of that, she has chose to call for a general election.

They said ministers from those member states are then scheduled to meet on May 22 to formally issue detailed directives for the negotiations to be led by Michel Barnier, who previously held high-level French government positions. Would it be that surprising if they voted for Labour given that Labour is supporting a soft Brexit, that Labour wants to salvage Europe's protections for the rights of workers, that Labour proposes a minimum wage of £10 an hour?

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