Mulvaney tells department heads to stay quiet amid budget rollout

Mulvaney tells department heads to stay quiet amid budget rollout

The plan aims for significant increases in military and border-security spending, and to offset these boosts, there will be cuts in many other parts of the government, like the State Department and Environmental Protection Agency.

"We very much are reliant on some of the funds, so we will be watching this very closely", Beaton said.

He went on to promise that "The president knows... who his voters are and we're going to take care of them no question", explaining the administration would do so "the same way that we've taken care of people for a long time in this country, which is through competition".

The budget eliminates funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers, which supports before and after school programs for 1.6 million children, the Washington Post reports. "We consider that to be a waste of your money".

"I can't defend that any more", Mulvaney said in a press conference on Thursday. He is correct. This proposed budget should not pass and it won't.

The Trump administration says the cuts are necessary to free up money for a $50 billion increase in defense spending.

Other departments facing cuts include the National Institutes of Health (NIH) at nearly 20%, Commerce at 15.7%, Education at 13.5%, Interior at 11.7%, Housing and Urban Development at 13.2%, and Transportation at 12.7%.

Accordingly, I submit to the Congress this Budget Blueprint to reprioritize Federal spending so that it advances the safety and security of the American people.

Public health, emergency preparedness and prevention programs: The budget said it will reform these key programs, including the addition of a new Federal Emergency Response Fund to rapidly respond to public health outbreaks, such as Zika.

The reason Trump's budget will not make America great again is simple: Trump's budget makes no attempt to prioritize the allocation of money against various important American needs and priorities in a strategic manner. "Meals on Wheels sounds great".

PAM FESSLER, BYLINE: At a hearing in New York City this week, public housing resident Sheryl Braxton complained about all the problems where she lives. We've spent $150 billion on [CDBGs] since the 1970s. "In fact, it's something we don't think we can defend anymore".

"While almost every Republican claims to be a fiscal conservative, many of them defend subsidy programs important to their states or personal interests", observed Chris Edwards, editor of the Cato Institute's DownsizingGovernment.org, who tossed out rural business subsidies as an example. The document released Thursday was just an outline; the full budget - which will include information on taxes, spending on entitlements such as Social Security, economic projections and other topics - probably won't come until May.

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