Unshackled, Trump unleashes aggressive attacks on own party

President Obama casts his vote for the upcoming presidential election at the Chicago Board of Elections 69 West Washington Street on Friday Oct. 7. | Santiago Covarrubias  Sun-Times

Declaring himself unshackled, the billionaire businessman went after House Speaker Paul Ryan after the congressional leader effectively abandoned Mr Trump in a private call with fellow Republicans.

Politico reported that, according to multiple sources familiar with the discussions within his inner circle, Ryan has discussed with close advisers whether he should formally withdraw his endorsement of Trump.

As for fundraising hurdles from his fight with Republicans, Trump may not take an enormous hit at this point if he spends the way he has for most of the race. "They don't know how to win - I will teach them!", he said in a tweet.

The top Republican in the US Congress says he won't defend Donald Trump nor campaign with him, plunging the Republican candidate's presidential bid deeper into crisis over his sexually aggressive remarks about women.

Trump sent out a tweet Tuesday saying that despite "winning the second debate in a landslide (every poll), it is hard to do well when Paul Ryan and others give zero support!" They said the move didn't intimidate Clinton, but there is an acknowledgment inside Clinton's campaign that if the wheels completely come off Trump's operation, the attacks could grow even more personal. "John McCain, the guy with the filthiest mouth in the Senate", Trump said of the war veteran. Senators Mark Kirk, Kelly Ayotte, and John McCain have their seats at stake because of Trump, and all pulled their support for the nominee after the Trump tape surfaced.

Trump apologized during the debate, and when pressed by debate moderator and CNN Anchor Anderson Cooper, Trump said he had never made unwanted sexual advances on women.

Meanwhile, Clinton's campaign hammered Republicans for recoiling from Trump at this late date, and she urged voters to hold GOP candidates accountable for standing by their nominee for months. Now, the question is whether Trump's quest for the presidency is all but over.

Many Republican members of Congress are concerned that Trump's chaotic campaign could ruin their chances of holding their majorities in the House of Representatives and Senate in the November election and could inflict long-term damage on the party.

Ryan told Republican MPs on a Monday conference call that he would focus instead on helping the party keep control of the House.

Both Mr Trump and Mrs Clinton head to the key battleground state of Florida with campaign events later on Tuesday (local time).

At the same time that Pence was onstage touting his running mate, Trump tweeted out a critical statement of House Speaker Paul Ryan, who has all but unendorsed the Republican presidential candidate.

Ms. Clinton's campaign has concluded that at least two traditionally Republican states, Georgia and Arizona, are realistic targets for her campaign to win over.

The pressure on the 70-year-old Trump at the debate will be intense. He said repeatedly that his lewd comments in the video were merely "locker room talk" and paled in comparison to what he called former President Bill Clinton's abuse of women.

When asked if he was concerned about the language Trump used in the recording, Maness replied in a statement: "I have only one thought or concerning Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton and that is what their election will mean for the issues important to America". The explanation failed to end the controversy, and Mr Trump's attacks on Mr Ryan threatened to distract from what Republicans want to be his main message: Going after Mrs Clinton.

Trump has said he'll appoint strict constitutionalists in the model of Justice Antonin Scalia. Those remarks were part of a pattern that clearly reveal Trump's attitude to women and his crude outlook on life. It's one he might not publicly acknowledge, but, knowing him, I imagine it's crossed his mind a couple of times.

"I don't think he's going to lose because of a lack of money in television ads".

Clinton herself will revive the Clinton-Gore 1992 White House ticket on Tuesday, campaigning in Miami with her husband's vice president Al Gore.

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