Suspect in New York, New Jersey bombings Ahmad Rahami arrested after shootout

Suspect in New York, New Jersey bombings Ahmad Rahami arrested after shootout

Scene of the bombing in Manhattan on September 17. His uncovered face was clearly captured by surveillance cameras near the spot of the blast.

Rahami was captured after he was discovered sleeping in the doorway of a bar by the owner, Harinder Bains.

When the officer approached the suspect, he immediately whipped out a handgun and shot the officer in the torso, hitting his protective vest, said acting Union County prosecutor Grace Park.

The paper said Federal Bureau of Investigation agents were trying to find out whether his actions had been informed by Islamic State or another such organisation.

In a Facebook post, a family member asked for privacy.

It wasn't known if Rahami had an attorney.

The bombing spread fear across the NY area and revived anxiety about homegrown terrorism nationwide.

Nine people were injured before the attacker was shot dead by off-duty police officer Jason Falconer.

The attacks - on top of a stabbing rampage in Minnesota on Saturday by a Somali-American with possible links to IS - fuelled the debate about America's security challenges seven weeks before the presidential election, with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton touting experience and patient determination, and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump demanding radical change.

President Barack Obama, in NY at the UN General Assembly with world leaders, called on Americans "not to succumb to fear" as presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump sparred over how best to combat terror attacks.

Rahami was charged with attempted murder of a law enforcement officer, unlawful possession of a weapon and possession of a weapon for an unlawful goal, prosecutors said. The lawsuit was terminated in 2012 because one of the brothers, Mohammad K. Rahami, had pleaded guilty to blocking police from enforcing restrictions on the restaurant.

According to sources, he may have become radicalized after a string of recent trips to the country and Pakistan.

To neighbors and customers of his family's storefront chicken takeout, Ahmad Khan Rahami was a friendly, quiet presence behind the counter who liked talking about cars and was generous with free food.

Rahami has been described as "a very friendly guy" by neighbours and customers of his family's fried-chicken shop. "That's what's so scary".

Law enforcement agencies have apprehended New Jersey resident Ahmad Khan Rahami, after a brief but intense manhunt by agencies seeking to question him about multiple bombs in NY and New Jersey since Saturday.

The FBI said Rahami was wanted in connection with a pipe bomb blast in Seaside Park, New Jersey on Saturday morning and the detonation of a pressure-cooker bomb in Manhattan that evening that injured 29 people.

Local and federal investigations are underway to determine whether charges will be filed.

So far, Rahami has not been cooperating with police, a law enforcement official said.

Five people were pulled over on Sunday night travelling in a auto associated with Rahami, were questioned and released. The law enforcement officials said at least one of Rahami's relatives was in the vehicle.

Sweeney would only say that they connected those two explosions through "evidence and analysis".

"But they checked, nearly two months, and they say, 'He's OK, he's clear, he's not terrorist.' Now they say he's a terrorist", the father said.

A local police source said the elder Rahami was present when police came to the house early Monday.

An officer arrived and confronted Rahami, who pulled a gun and fired, authorities said.

Another police officer was grazed by a bullet. "We will not allow political correctness and soft-on-terror, soft-on-crime policies to threaten our security and our lives".

"One of the officials said that all or majority may have been from the same family and that they may have been on their way to the airport", the New York Times reports. He called on Americans to show the world "we will never give in to fear".

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